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My Ten Favorite Tweets – Week Ending 100909

From the home office in Oslo…

#1: I’d like to publicly state for the record that I never accept sponsorship or freebies for my blog posts…because no one ever offers any…

#2: The Nobel Peace Prize for Obama is a signal to him, a very large signal, to keep doing what he’s doing. It’s not an achievement award.

#3: Did you see @defrag‘s mashup of Gartner Hype Cycle & Moore’s Chasm? http://ow.ly/tr6d Social media/E20 in trough of visionary adoption

#4: Firms Need a System for Recognizing and Empowering Innovation Catalysts (via Spigit blog) http://bit.ly/RlMS8 #innovation #wbf09

#5: Slideshare Gets More Serious About Monetizing Their Business http://ow.ly/t79P Two options: Adshare, Leadshare

#6: Hamel: WL Gore manages T&E this way = all expenses posted online for peers to see. Outcome? No need for restrictions. #wbf09

#7: Lucas: “Never imagined people would go frame by frame in Star Wars, and tweet their friends about its [cinematic tricks]” #wbf09

#8: Pickens: I’m more powerful in Washington D.C. now because I have 1.6mm people signed up in support of my energy plan. #wbf09

#9: Lencioni: Need to be able to disagree on things. Need trust for this to work. Conflict without trust is politics. #wbf09

#10: http://twitpic.com/k68s4 – I’m at a wedding that starts in 10 minutes. My son is ring bearer.

From the home office in Oslo…

#1: I’d like to publicly state for the record that I never accept sponsorship or freebies for my blog posts…because no one ever offers any…

#2: The Nobel Peace Prize for Obama is a signal to him, a very large signal, to keep doing what he’s doing. It’s not an achievement award.

#3: Did you see @defrag‘s mashup of Gartner Hype Cycle & Moore’s Chasm? http://ow.ly/tr6d Social media/E20 in trough of visionary adoption

#4: Firms Need a System for Recognizing and Empowering Innovation Catalysts (via Spigit blog) http://bit.ly/RlMS8 #innovation #wbf09

#5: Slideshare Gets More Serious About Monetizing Their Business http://ow.ly/t79P Two options: Adshare, Leadshare

#6: Hamel: WL Gore manages T&E this way = all expenses posted online for peers to see. Outcome? No need for restrictions. #wbf09

#7: Lucas: “Never imagined people would go frame by frame in Star Wars, and tweet their friends about its [cinematic tricks]” #wbf09

#8: Pickens: I’m more powerful in Washington D.C. now because I have 1.6mm people signed up in support of my energy plan. #wbf09

#9: Lencioni: Need to be able to disagree on things. Need trust for this to work. Conflict without trust is politics. #wbf09

#10: http://twitpic.com/k68s4 – I’m at a wedding that starts in 10 minutes. My son is ring bearer.

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Tragedy of the Commons: Twitter vs Online Forums

Riding on board a Virgin America flight, I have CNN on my seat media screen. I’m watching CNN much more than I’m usually able to.

I notice those tweets flashing along the bottom of the screen. Some are good. Many aren’t. They are examples of the tendency for online discussions to devolve into name calling, stereotypes and ad hominem attacks.

They remind of the worst sort of comments found on online message boards. The problem with inline message boards is that there is little control by the individual for what they see. It’s not just political discussions. Marketers pollute LinkedIn message boards with their spammy webinar solicitations.

It’s the tragedy of the commons. A common resource – message boards – is overrun by those not providing quality contributions.

With Twitter’s one-way subscribe model, this particular attack on the commons is limited. Why? It’s easy to unfollow those who post irrelevant or non-productive things.

Want to be a participant beyond the amen chorus and fellow polemicists, or get people to actually care about your webinar? Figure out how to engage in an intelligent discussion.

A benefit of Twitter: managing the tragedy of the commons. It should be noted, however, that enabling discussions among multiple people is quite important. Letting multiple people on a thread while preventing the spammers is the next step in protecting and improving the value of the commons.

Clinton, Hamel, Krugman, Lucas…and Me: World Business Forum

WBF crowd 2008The first four names in the title – and many others – will be speaking at the World Business Forum in New York City on Oct 6-7, 2009.

And I ‘ll be listening to them. From the mezzanine level of Radio City Music Hall, where the journalists will be. I explain why below.

What is the World Business Forum? From its Wikipedia entry:

The World Business Forum is an annual global business summit held at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. A 2008 Burson-Marsteller survey ranks the World Business Forum among the world’s top five most influential venues for CEO’s and C-Suite executives.

This is my first time attending. The lineup of speakers is impressive:

  • Bill Clinton
  • Gary Hamel
  • Paul Krugman
  • George Lucas
  • T. Boone Pickens
  • David Rubenstein (co-founder, managing partner of private equity firm The Carlyle Group)
  • Irene Rosenfeld (CEO of Kraft, USA Today story)
  • Kevin Roberts (CEO of Saatchi & Saatchi)
  • and many others…

I’ll be participating in two ways: my company Spigit is a sponsor, so we’ll have a table there. And I’m a late addition to the Bloggers Hub as well. Looking forward to a great view from the mezzanine – where the journalists are apparently located – and wifi.

Look for my tweets with the #wbf09 hash tag.

My Ten Favorite Tweets – Week Ending 100209

From the home office in Rio de Janeiro…

#1: When it comes to innovation, trust your intuition http://bit.ly/2SyYkz by @PaulSloane Question your logic before you question your intuition

#2: Title alone is enough: My Best Innovation Advice? Be Promiscuous http://bit.ly/oa4RL by Scott Anthony on Harvard Business

#3: I confess this NYT essay resonates with me: Why Good Writers Can Be Bad Conversationalists http://bit.ly/13L7Tf (via @berkun)

#4: This is cool: 25 Logos with Hidden Messages http://bit.ly/3hLQMq I’d never noticed the arrow in the FedEx logo

#5: Interesting discussion about Yammer’s fortunes currently on TechCrunch. @arrington hears it’s gangbusters http://bit.ly/1bIAhL

#6: RT @mdoeff A screenshot of the Twitterati 100 from July ’08 http://bit.ly/V5EEd @kevinrose was #1 at 51K followers {so ol’ skool}

#7: Heard of auction site Swoopo? Users buy “bids” in advance, then can bid on items. Result is low winning bids (e.g. $10 for widescreen LCD).

#8: @kn0thing Wahoowa to you Alexis. Like seeing UVA guys mixing it up out there. Great job on Reddit.

#9: Men & healthcare: My wife just scheduled my physical, because I’d never do it. Asked bachelor co-worker when he last got physical: “college”

#10: Today is my 10th wedding anniversary. Last song of the reception that night 10 years ago: Come On Eileen http://bit.ly/wCMQs Random, eh?

Use Your Company Blog to Catch Search Term Typos

If your company or product name can be misspelled, this is for you.

At Spigit, a prospective customer related this to us recently. A few months ago, they had heard of Spigit in one of the usual ways – reading, word of mouth, etc. At some point, they decided to learn more. It probably went something like this…

“What was that innovation software company again? Oh yeah, SPIGOT.”

Notice the typo there. Or maybe Spigit is better termed the typo.

Anyway, first they tried http://www.spigot.com. But that leads to someone sitting on that domain for quite a while. Confused, they did the next logical thing. They searched on variations of SPIGOT:

  • spigot software
  • spigot idea management
  • spigot innovation management
  • spigot gumbo

Unable to find Spigit, they moved on with their life. Until last week, when the prospect was talking with one of our customers, who mentioned SPIGIT. Ding! The prospect remembered their interest, got the right spelling and we are talking, several months later.

Obviously, this presents something of a problem. How to catch those people actually searching for SPIGIT, but typing SPIGOT? We do maintain Google AdWords covering this. But what about in the search results themselves?

At first blush, two options are apparent. One, use the word SPIGOT on our website. But that would be confusing to visitors. It would look like we don’t know how to spell our own company name, or maintain a typo-infested website. Two, take advantage of those meta tag keywords, adding SPIGOT to them. But Google recently confirmed that those meta tag keywords have no effect on search results. None.

But there was one other way to do it. Why not take advantage of our search engine-indexed blog? Publish a blog post specifically designed to include the misspelled company name, along with additional relevant search terms. That way, there will at least be something in the search results for people honestly trying to find your company.

So I wrote this post, Spigot Innovation and Idea Management Software Platform

The post is intended to let searchers know why it exists, and redirect them to the website home page:

Spigot blog post

I’m no SEO expert – honest, check my Twitter bio! But I figure this may help get the attention of those using SPIGOT to find SPIGIT.

Another use for the company blog.