About these ads

There Really Is Nothing that Cannot Be Innovated


Credit: Damjan Stanković

Credit: John Chuckman

In a recent post, Four Quadrants of Innovation, I described one type of innovation as leveraging existing technologies, serving existing customers. In popular culture, this type of innovation is..well, frankly it’s boring. No cool new advances, no new stuff you haven’t tried before.

But what is compelling about this type of innovation is how well it fits Clayton Christensen’s focus on understanding the “job” your product has been hired to do. Companies need to stay on top of their products, and changes in customer behaviors. Sometimes that’s sexy new technology advances. Mostly, it’s not. Rather, it’s good ol’ roll-up-the-sleeves and innovate to meet changing customer needs and expectations.

SlideShare CEO Rashmi Sinha wrote a great post recently where she asked Is it time to reimagine your product / service? She makes the point that many web services reflect their vintage year. They fail to evolve as the market does, ultimately falling further behind the curve of customer expectations.

Rashmi Sinha’s post very much reminds me of Clayton’s Christensen’s point of view. Your customers have:

  • Requirements you have not yet discovered at any given point in time
  • Changing requirements over time that you need to decide whether to meet

On top of that, there’s something deeper in the Sinha’s post. There are times you need to push need innovations, even if your customers aren’t yet asking for them. Let your customers catch up to you.

These points don’t just apply to web services. They apply to all manner of products and services. Everything can be innovated. One key is to understand that sometimes innovation comes in service delivery or business models, not just product features.

Even things you wouldn’t expect to be innovated, can indeed be innovated.

In line with this, I came across a great post by Jake Kuramoto of Oracle AppsLab. In Unexpected Innovation, Jake notes two recent innovations he has seen with…

traffic lights. Of all things.

Yes, Traffic Lights Can Be Innovated

The first innovation is actually not all that surprising, and really is the application of existing technology. New lights use energy efficient LED bulbs. They have some issues to be worked out in terms of their ability to melt accumulated snow. But they make a lot of sense.

The second innovation is one that really speaks to a deeper understanding of what’s going with traffic lights. See the pictures at the top of this post? Designer Damjan Stanković came up with a concept where a timer is added to stoplights. Stanković posits these benefits of such a timer:

  • Less pollution. Drivers can turn their engines off and cut carbon emissions while waiting for the green light.
  • Less fuel consumption. Turning off your vehicle while waiting on the traffic light can lower fuel consumption in the long run.
  • Less stress. Since you know exactly how long you have to wait you can sit back and clear your head for a while.
  • Safer driving. With the Eko light both drivers and pedestrians can be fully aware of how much time they have left before the light changes and that way reduce the chance for potential traffic accidents.

That last bullet is the benefit that intrigues me most, in terms of the job I want a stoplight to do: safer driving. Here in San Francisco, we have walk signals at intersections that include countdowns. When the WALK signals appears, you can see how many seconds are left to cross the street.

Both Jake Kuramoto use these walk signal countdowns in a different way. When you are driving, you can see the countdowns. If you’re, say 50 meters out, this gives you something of an advantage in how you approach the intersection. When there are only a few seconds left, you know the light will be yellow well before you get to the intersection. With kids in the car, I slow down to be ready to stop for what will be a late yellow light by the time I reach the intersection.

Now if someone had asked me, I wouldn’t have come up with a requirement for traffic lights to have timers. But because someone put those countdowns on the walk signals, I’ve found myself using them in my driving when they are available. And Stanković’s design makes me realize that, “hey, I want those timers on traffic lights.”

Which goes to show you. Everything can be innovated upon. Even the most…uh…pedestrian of products and services.

Finally, I love this quote from Amazon’s Jeff Bezos in a Newsweek interview:

There’s a tendency, I think, for executives to think that the right course of action is to stick to the knitting—stick with what you’re good at. That may be a generally good rule, but the problem is the world changes out from under you if you’re not constantly adding to your skill set.

Markets are always shifting. Don’t think that anything is immune from innovation.

About these ads

About Hutch Carpenter
Senior Consultant for HYPE Innovation (hypeinnovation.com)

5 Responses to There Really Is Nothing that Cannot Be Innovated

  1. Have to say, Hutch, I agree that all things can conceivably be innovated, but there are a whole bunch of things that lawyers and other risk managers and “protectors” (insurance companies, lawmakers, assorted “do gooders” etc) will not readily allow to be innovated. Stoplights are likely one of them, no matter how great an idea this might be. This has and will continue to make it hard for innovators to innovate where innovation otherwise makes sense.

  2. Pingback: There Really Is Nothing that Cannot Be Innovated | CloudAve

  3. Jake says:

    Jackie has a point about the adoption of innovative changes. Look at the LED stop lights for an example. They save municipalities hundreds of thousands of dollars, but they get the most ink for failing to melt snow.

    This is a bad combination of factors: lots of users, deep-seeded expectations and high risk. In these scenarios, innovation is tough, but that doesn’t mean it’s not needed. Frankly, the most mundane and ordinary tasks and objects cry out loudly for innovation b/c the benefits are far-reaching. It’s the convincing that’s difficult, not the innovation.

    BTW, I love the pictures used to emphasize the point. The form of the stop light hasn’t changed much over the decades, but I’ll bet the innards have. This is a fascinating topic.

    Thanks for expanding on it Hutch.

  4. Larry Mckeogh says:

    I am in agreement as well and really enjoyed your perspective. As Jackie mentions, innovation is only half the battle. It is however, the important half. After that it is a matter of getting the naysayers and society’s gatekeepers to see the benefits of change. Human nature being what it is though, change is never easy. But if it wasn’t possible, I suppose we still be hunting and gathering.

  5. Pingback: Coffee Reads of the Week – the magician and the future « coffeechat with perkyperps

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 677 other followers

%d bloggers like this: